Geothermal and Going Green

climate-masterIt seems like everyone is going “green” these days. There are solar power options, wind power, organic products and more, all of which are supposed to better the environment one way or another. However, the fact remains that one of the most important ways to “go green” is to cut your carbon footprint. Of the many factors that contribute to a carbon footprint, your home energy usage, is one of the largest. As such, your HVAC system can be a large contributor to your overall energy use. However, there are green furnace and heating options available that can help you slash your energy usage, without cutting down on your comfort.

If you really want to go green and reduce your energy expenses, while maintaining the most comfortable home possible, then you should know a thing or two about geothermal heating. What is this technology and can it be of use to you?

First, you might be under the impression that to use geothermal energy, you have to be near a natural geothermal feature – like a hot spring or something similar. This is actually false. Geothermal technology can be used anywhere within the US and it does not necessarily rely on natural geothermal features.

The underlying premise here is that the earth beneath your feet is able to maintain a constant temperature throughout the entire year. Just a few feet below the surface, the temperature varies very little, whether it is the height of summer or the depths of winter. A geothermal heat pump takes advantage of this.

A geothermal heat pump uses the consistent temperature beneath the soil to cool or heat coolant, which is then used to condition your air. For instance, during the summer, a geothermal heat pump sends heated coolant into the earth to a heat exchange. Here, heat is transferred to the surrounding soil, cooling the fluid in the coolant lines. The fluid then completes a circle and is used once more.

The single most important benefit here is that geothermal technology allows you to reduce the costs of heating and cooling your home. Because the earth around your home maintains the same temperature throughout the year, your heat pump does not have to work as hard to heat or cool the air sent into your home. This slashes the amount of electricity used by your system, lightening the load on the local power grid.

Therefore, you can see that using a geothermal heat pump offers savings for your power bill, but also helps to reduce your carbon footprint. Of course, geothermal systems are not right for everyone. Speaking with one of our Comfort Consultants will help you determine if this is the right path for you to take.

Learn more about how green your heating and cooling system can really be!